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thank you

Thank you to all the people who have given me the help, support and encouragement which has made and continues to make this trip possible.

  • Melda and Jakub, in Prague, CZ, for being an important part of the very beginning of this trip, for putting me up when leaving Prague, for looking after sundry belongings to this day, for driving me and my bike to the airport, for ongoing technical support, on route, with all things digital.
  • Nic and Mike in Tabor, CZ for storing most of my Czech-based belongings in the attic of their house and extra thanks to Mike for hosting this blog and all his help with it.
  • Thomas, of Radspannerei, in Berlin, for building me a great bike.
  • Ron and Barb in Anchorage for being my first Warm Showers hosts – and exceptional ones, at that.
  • Dawn and Faith in Coldfoot for offering to look after a food package posted there and providing me with alternative food when it didn’t arrive in time. No thanks go to US Post.
  • Teresa and the truck drivers at her Hot Spot Cafe on the Dalton Highway just north of Yukon Crossing for organising to transport some of my gear to Fairbanks.
  • John Gimbel in Fairbanks for the extended use of his house.
  • Gary the bus driver in Denali National Park for a memorable bus ride.
  • Christine, in Talkeetna, for organising me a free seat in a small plane for a flight over Mount McKinley.
  • Johanna, of Anchorage, first for letting me sleep in the spare bed in her hotel room in Talkeetna and then for sending me onwards armed with her address in Anchorage.
  • Tom and Bridgette, in Palmer, for their warm spontaneous hospitality.
  • Johanna (again), Steve and Angela, for offering me refuge in Anchorage.
  • Adam, at Anchorage REI, for tuning up my bike after the rigours of the Dalton Highway free of charge.
  • Jay and Debbie. on the Tok Cutaway, for the maintaining the bike bus and offering it up to touring cyclists free of charge.
  • Renate and Gunter, at River Creek Campground, for giving me a new spoon, a truly essential camping item, when I needed one.
  • Tracy and Danusia (and all their various friends) in Whitehorse, for their warmth, hospitality and friendship.
  • The camp operators at Boya Lake Provincial Park, for a warm invitation to breakfast with them.
  • Richard, a fellow cyclist, for his company, which made Stewart a great place to be.
  • Heide and Andreas, of Austria, for feeding me very well on at least two occasions when our paths happened to cross in British Columbia.
  • Fred, in the Nisga’a Lava Bed Valley, for a hot cup of coffee on a rainy morning.
  • Penny and Ian, of Prince Rupert, for their hospitality and a great canoe adventure.
  • Sheila, of Lasqueti, for her friendship and conversation and letting me stay in her beautiful house over the water.
  • Chris, in Nanaimo, for rescuing a total stranger at dusk from a wet carkpark and providing a warm comfortable bed for the night.
  • Jane and Eric, migratory cyclists with a Salt Springs base, for their advice, friendship and hospitality.
  • Mark, on Whidbey Island, for feeding and entertaining me and providing me a place to pitch my tent on his expansive lawn.
  • Donna, of Seattle, for spontaneously offering me a bed for the night.
  • Tom and Jacky, of Seattle, for their hospitality.
  • Babs and Dennis, in Forks, Washington, for all sort of things: among them – good food, warm hospitality and showing me around the Olympic Penninsula.
  • Dave, in Beverly Beach Campground, for sharing his knowledge of mushrooms with me.
  • Bike Newport, in Newport, Oregon, for being a great bikeshop and ‘day hostel’ for touring cyclists.
  • The anonymous Fed-Ex Man who rescued me from a potentially scary dog incident.
  • Brian, at Jedidiah Smith National Park, California, for letting me use his fishing rod and not minding too much that I lost his lures.
  • Joe, who found me on the streets of Arcata, California, and put me up for the night, did my laundrey, fed me rubarb and strawberry pie and proved to be charming company.
  • Bill and Cheryle, of Ferndale, who spontaneously offered me dinner and a bed for the night.
  • Judy, Greg and Clare, of the San Fransico Bay Area, for their generosity in letting me be part of their busy lives and the help, support and advice they provided during an extended stay.
  • Stella, of the San Fransico Bay Area, for becoming a friend.
  • Doris and John, of June Lake, for their generous hospitality and excellent food and a great day around Mono Lake and Brodie.
  • Brain and Kathleen, of Bishop, for providing warmth and shelter on a couple of cold windy days.
  • Mike for sharing his knowledge of Death Valley.
  • The dirt-bike guys who stopped in the middle of the Mojave Desert to ask if I needed help when they saw I was repairing my bike.
  • George, at the Needles Inn, for doing my laundry and providing an idiosyncratic and unexpected refuge.
  • Jess and Tank, in Tuyasan, for giving me a warm comfortable base from which to explore the Grand Canyon and for some great late night conversations.
  • Josh and Melanie, of Flagstaff, for exceptional hospitality and support.
  • Bryce, of AZ Bikes, Flagstaff, for letting me use his workshop and supervising me while I tackled my bike repairs.
  • Nita, of Pie Town, who I never actually even met – a trail angel who provides an amazing refuge at the Toaster House for weary walkers and bikers on the Great Divide Route.
  • Cathy and Ron, of the Pie-o-Neer Cafe, for looking after four hungry cyclists on Thanksgiving and lavishing lots of pie on us for the duration of our stay in Pie Town.
  • George, who turned up just in time to alleviate our foodless plight in Pie Town, where there is plenty of pie but no grocery stores.
  • Klara, at the Gila Hot Springs, for giving us fresh elk meat and other goodies which saved us from a dinnerless night.
  • Jamie and his household in Silver City, for letting us colonise their lounge room floor for quite a long time.
  • Dave, at the Bike Works in Silver City, for creating such a great resource for cyclists and for helping me out with my bike.
  • Oscar, the Mexican border offical, for making our entry into Mexico an exceptional experience.
  • Carlos in Ejido el Largo, Chihuahua, Mexico, for giving us a place to lay our heads in his crowded work house and also to Soco, for feeding us.
  • Jesus, in Ejido el Largo, Chihuahua, Mexico, for the tamales and bunuelos.
  • Keith, of Entre Amigos, in Urique, for creating a magic garden and a great place to stay.
  • Pollo, in Guachochi, Chihuahua, for all the excellent food and entertaining stories in his seafood restaurant.
  • Abraham Garcia, in Tepehuanes, who sought us out to talk bike talk and hooked us up with the Durango mountain biking scene.
  • Jose Ramon, Jorge, Jaime, of the Cocono Salvajes Mountain Bike Club in Santiago Papasquiaro, for putting us up, feeding us, taking us for a ride and generally looking after us.
  • Genaro Garcia, in Canatlan, for his extra-ordinarily generous hospitality.
  • Panchito Garcia, for the use of his workshop in Durango.
  • Frida and Jorge Luis, for unquestioningly offering hospitality to four tired dirty cyclists at short notice.
  • Victor and his house mate in Zacatecas and Monica and Andrea in Guadalupe, for their hospitality – totally different in style but equally generous.
  • Jeff, Jason and Cass, fellow cyclists, for providing me with knowledgeable, challenging and extremely entertaining companionship for three months. Cass, in the first place, for inviting me to join them; Jeff, for teaching me names of the birds and the stars (or at least some of them); Jason, for providing a cool soundtrack in hotel rooms and by the camp fire; all of them for being fantastic company during many great adventures.
  • Angel Guytan Bautista, who insisted on guiding me through Guadalupe to the highway.
  • Ray, in San Miguel de Allende, for treating me to a lovely birthday dinner and putting me up for a couple of nights.
  • Meara, in Queretaro, for her hospitality.
  • The guy at Chincua Butterfly Sanctuary who gave me information and directions to the sanctuary at Mancheros.
  • Ruth and her family, who fed me and gave me a much needed place to sleep when no camping possibilities presented themselves to me.
  • Samuel, Cesar and Mikki, in Toluca, for looking after me.
  • Marco Antonio Gonzales, who generously dedicated an afternoon to riding with me as a guide from La Marquesa into Mexico City.
  • Alisa and her flat-mates, in Mexico City, for providing me a couch to sleep on and letting me (and all my belongings) stay for a such a long time that we became good friends.
  • Rose and her charming cat, Yumi, for putting me up for almost a week in Mexico City.
  • Kodiak, from Ciclovida in Mexico City, who gave me a new helmet to replace the one that was stolen in Guachochi.
  • Monica Wyszkowska, in Puebla, who lent me a pair of hiking boots for my ascent of Iztaccihuatl.
  • Grant Ferguson, of Mexico City, for letting me make his apartment my home during my second sojourn in DF.
  • Cheve Barojas, from Mexico City, for guiding me up Iztaccihuatl.
  • The Martinez family, in Chiapas, who, without hesitating, offered me hospitality and shared everything they had with me.
  • Elias, for letting me camp on the veranadah at Cueva de Tejon by a gorgeous river near Bonampak.
  • The French man and his son who invited me to dinner at Tikal.
  • Antonio, in Uaxactun, Guatemala, who took a serious interest in my jungle adventure and provided lots of information and guidance to help make it happen.
  • Cain and his workmate at the Dos Lagunas work camp in Peten, Gautemala, for letting me stay the night and use their kitchen.
  • Everybody at the Rio Azul work camp in Peten, Guatemala, where I stayed for two nights, for their help, advice and hospitality.
  • George, the ex-pat Hungarian in Belize, who let me camp behind his house.
  • Bruce, in Belize, who spent several hours of his time phoning around to find the right people to assist me cross a river which would have otherwise blocked my way.
  • The rangers at Hillbank, for sharing their lunch with me.
  • Nat and Katy, the ornithologists at Hillbank, Belize, who offered me a warm welcome where it was otherwise tepid and proved such interesting and entertaining company that I ended up staying two nights.
  • Ingrid, in San Felipe, Belize, who saw how crestfallen I looked when she told me she didn’t have any tamales for sale, fed me chicken, rice and beans instead, wouldn’t let me pay for it and insisted I must visit again when I next pass that way.
  • The guy who, when I asked if he knew where I could camp on the heavily developed Yucatan Peninsula coastline approaching Playa de Carmen, without saying a word, simply opened the gate to his property and showed me where I could set up my tent and plied me with a multitude of edible treats.
  • Hector and Vero, in Cancun, who provided accommodation and heaps of support while I to-ed and fro-ed in and out of Cancun while preparing to go to Cuba.
  • Reishee, on his floating island on the lagoon on Isla Mujeres, for letting me stay in that magic realm.
  • Tom, at the Marina Paraiso on Isla Mujeres, for offering me my second floating home on the Isla Mujeres and John, for making sure I was well fed while I was there.
  • Bernado, from Belgium, who I met on the flight to Cuba and who helped me with my boxed bike on the journey from Jose Marti Airport into Havana.
  • Silvia and Regis, a couple of French cyclists I met at Playa Jutias, who treated my hand after a minor bike accident.
  • Osmany, at the Ecological Station on Gunahabibicanes Peninsula, Cuba, for sharing his considerable knowledge of the area and for his genuine interest in me and my journey.
  • The Dutch couple I met on the beach at Las Tumlas, Cuba, who gave me some Bettadine to treat my hand.
  • Alejandro, Ramon and Yoanna, three biology students studying sea turtles on the Gunahabibicanes Peninsula, who welcomed me into their camp on a wild windy, rainy day and shared their dinner and dreams with me.
  • Mercerdes and Sofia, in La Bajada, Cuba, for welcoming me into their home and feeding me.
  • All the people in Cuba who refilled my water bottles.
  • Laurenca, in Guasana, who cooked a fine meal for me, with what little she had, and tried to refuse any payment for it.
  • Katarina and William, fellow cyclists that I met in Trinidad, Cuba, who improved the quality of my sleep by giving me one of their Thermarests when I mentioned that mine had recalcitrant punctures.
  • Lazaro, the caretaker at the monument to Antonio D., outside Trinidad, who let me camp there and gave me cold water and hot coffee.
  • Hector and Vero (again), for putting me up (again) in Cancun. These people are great!
  • Rodrigo, in Cancun, for letting me stay, longer and longer, and providing me with chilled out conversation and relaxed companionship.
  • The Manglares de Dzinitun project, in Celestun, for giving me a tour and a lovely place to camp.
  • Lea/Jodie, in Morales, for an extended stay in her mountain retreat where I could gorge myself on food, conversation and books and undertake the massive project of creating a set of framebags.
  • Micycle, a bikeshop in London, for providing me with the tools and support needed for me to build a new wheel.
  • Alissia and Raul, of Curnevaca, for lending me their sewing machine.
  • Noah, of Montecassino, Morales, who spontaneously stopped to offer me a lift into Cuernavaca when I was burdened by the sewing machine.
  • The family who let me camp in their yard on my first night in Guatemala.
  • All the guards at various archeological sites in the El Mirador basin, Peten Guatemala, who provided me with cups of coffee and shared their frijoles and tortillas with me.
  • Henri, from the Nakbe encampment in Peten, Guatemala, who accompanied me to Carmelita, after I was bitten by a fox and needed to get medical attention, and to Cameron (the horse’s name is Prawn in English), the long-suffering and valiant horse.
  • Conchita of Carmelita, Peten, Guatemala, who looked after my bike while I walked to El Mirador and exerted herself considerably to organise a lift for me to the health services of Santa Elena when I returned after being bitten by a fox.
  • The two drivers of Carmelita’s collective vehicle who drove me to San Benito Hospital and then to a hotel in Flores in the middle of the night.
  • The all the staff at the Santa Elena Health Centre, Peten, Guatemala who administered my rabies vaccines and especially to the nurse who came specially on Saturday morning when the Centre is not normally open to give me my second injection.
  • Claudia, in Guatemala City, who – never having met me before – picked me up from the bus station, drove me to the hospital, and generally went out of her to look after me when I arrived on extremely short notice to get yet another anti-rabies injection.
  • N., who would rather not be named, who extraordinarily generously sent me a package of quality parts to repair my limping bicycle.
  • Paula, of Bio Itza Spanish School, San Jose, Guatemala, for looking after me in San Jose and making sure that I was happy and comfortable.
  • Reginaldo, of Bio Itza Spanish School, San Jose, Guatemala, for two weeks of intelligent and inspiring conversations on any number of subjects during which he did not forget his role as my teacher and patiently corrected the errors of my Spanish. Special thanks for the parting gift of a book by Rigoberta Menchu.
  • Silke, a German cyclist who I travelled with for a month or so, for following me where she might not have bothered to go of her own accord.
  • Kevin, in Xela, for hard-core yoga classes and the odd meal at the Xela Yoga House and conversation about books and life at the Vrisa’s Bookstore.
  • Tank and Mike for inviting me to crash their scene in San Pedro, Guatemala.
  • All the crew at Maya Pedal, in San Andres, Guatemala, for a warm welcome and good food and especially to Bruce for his patience and expertise with my bike.
  • The girl, whose name I forget, who offered up the church next door to her house as a camp-site in a small town, whose name I also forget, near Guatemala’s border with El Salvador.
  • The family who offered me hospitality and food on my first night in El Salvador.
  • Lindsey, a friend from Prague, for making the time to hang out by the lake for a lazy week.
  • Kelly and Kurt, fellow cyclists, for excellent company and conversation while cycling, cooking, camping.
  • Lem and Veneranda, of Brus Laguna, in La Moskitia, Honduras, for  information, hospitality and friendship.
  • Alex for coconuts, prawns and a camp site in his back yard.
  • Bani Zalaya and his son for guiding me through the jungle when I lost the path between Brus Laguna and Ahuas.
  • Ignacio, who appeared like an angel on the banks of a nameless river in the middle of the jungle, and pushed my bike to the River Putuca where I wanted to be.
  • Javier and his brothers who ferried me across the Putuca and who, in mythological style, I paid with a zapote seed.
  • Yudinya and Carla, in Ahuas, for their hospitality and kindness while I regained energy for the second leg of my Moskitia adventure.
  • Geraldo and Norbel - doctors at the Ahuas Mission Hospital who let me use their internet
  • All the other people in La Moskitia, whose names I did not record, who helped me with much needed information and guidance in negotiating the areas roadless swamp, jungle and savannah, not to mention physical assistance in getting me and my bike across various rivers.
  • Chente and Ilona, on Little Corn, for introducing me to the world underwater.
  • Steph and Esmeralda, on Little Corn, for congenial company and conversation.
  • The ranger at the Rincon de la Veija National Park in Guanacaste, Costa Rica, for letting me camp at the station and walk in the forest on non-public tracks, and who lent me his bird book and binoculars and showed me the larvae and caterpillars he was cultivating.
  • Sarah and Tom, for sharing the road and meals for a while.
  • The fire station guys.
  • Emapanada George in Bocas del Toro.
  • Janice in Bocas.
  • Karl and Iris, who during our second encounter, in Bocas – the first being on Isla Mujeres in Mexico – offer to let me sail with them to San Blas. It didn’t end up happening but the offer was very much appreciated.
  • Zen Ben , in Santa Catalina, Panama, for handing me the keys to Blue Zone.
  • Leonida.
  • Hippie Mike for calmly talking me through some of the insanities of Santa Catalina.
  • Michelle, of Buena Vida, in Santa Catalina, for yoga classes and girl talk.
  • Rose for comparing notes on running a hostel in Santa Catalina.
  • Ellie and Patricia, of Surf’n’Shake in Santa Catalina, for pineapple and ginger shakes and a place to escape to.
  • Herbie for letting me – however reluctantly – do my dive master training at Scuba Coiba in Santa Catalina.
  • Luca and Cristophe, the Italians at Scuba Coiba, for taking on my dive training and making sure it got done, finally…
  • Orlando, Amando, Cholo and Casimiro, the captains and crew of the Orca and Robin, Scuba Coiba‘s boats for help and support on my first days out alone as a dive master.
  • Diver Ben, in Santa Catalina, for being amusing company.
  • Juan and Crissy, in Santa Catalina, for inspiring bread and baking.

There has been a long hiatus in additions to this list which is symptomatic, perhaps, of a faltering, a loss of direction, a time in which I forgot what is most important. Because if I have learnt anything at all of importance from my trip it is that kindness is common. So common that I have, it seems, started to take it for granted, which is a sorry state of affairs. At the end of every day, I should make it a habit to list all the people who helped me – with directions, with advice, with a smile, with food, with good will, with simple good grace – sometimes in the face of unseemly bad temper and bad grace on my own part. I am sitting, now, in the south of Chile trying to recall from memory all the people I should have included on this list since I first arrived in South America!

  • Alfredo, who gave me passage from Panama to Colombia on the good ship, El Inesperado, and Poli, his father. It was an amazing voyage.
  • Gabriela, who I accosted on the streets of Cartagena, and Bruno, her partner, for a shady and calm place to stay in the tourist frenzy that is Cartagena in summer.
  • All the various people, whose names – to my shame – I no longer recall, on the Caribbean coast and in the north of Colombia, who felt the need to feed me, provided me with water, gave me fruit and cups of coffee, introduced me to their families, offered me a bed, and otherwise opened their hearts to me. Like, for just one example, the guy who tried to give me the shirt off his own back in the dust and heat between Mompox and Caucasia to protect me against the sun.
  • The guy in Taraza who took the trouble to impress on me that the mountain route I was considering really was dangerous and ill-advised.
  • Dave, in Medellin, for generous hospitality, some really good cooking and interesting conversations over a bottle of wine or two.
  • Manuel, Marta and Manuela, for their Casa de Ciclista in San Antonio de Prado which is warm and welcoming.
  • Patricia, Manuel’s cousin, who fed me and gave me a bed for the night, and to her husband and son who guided me on my way in the morning.
  • The guys who operate the ferry barge across the river Cauca on a private estancia who ferried me to the other side of the river and refused any payment.
  • Edward for letting my camp at the bird sanctuary in the cloud forest on a cold wet afternoon and allowing me to accompany him in the morning on a bird watching walk with a client.
  • Hector and his wife and daughter, in Santa Rosa de Cabal, Colombia, for inviting me into their home and taking time to give me detailed directions for a back road route to Los Nevados National Park.
  • The rangers in Los Nevados National Park who tolerated my presence in a National Park that was officially closed to the public at the time.
  • Mauricio and Natalie, for picking me up, cold, dirty and wet, off the streets of Villa Maria and drying me out, feeding me and showing me a good time.
  • The guys at Casa Murillo, and particularly Brian, who went out of their way to make me welcome and show me the sights of Murillo.
  • Eduardo, in Bogota, for putting me up while I organised my Brazilian visas and then again after my abortive attempt to venture into Venuzuela,
  • The guy who picked me up in the Tatacoa Desert after a massive blowout and drove me to the nearest village, made sure I managed to find a replacement tire, and then bought me lunch.
  • The guy in the bike shop in Pitalito who built me a new wheel in an instant after my rim had developed a frightening crack.
  • The electrician who looks after the telephone towers on the first pass of the Trampoline of Death, between Mocoa and Pasto, who invited me in when I asked if I could camp by his house; and also to his young son, who cooked a delicious breakfast during a tempestuous morning storm the following day.
  • The firemen at the Tulcan Fire Station, Tulcan, Ecuador, for a welcome refuge after a hectic ride from Bogota.
  • Efren Imacuan, of Tulcan, Ecuador, who worked on my wheel in his workshop and refused any payment.
  • The two girls, who can’t have been more than ten years old, who found me a camp site in the mountains above Otavalo.
  • Steve, Maria, Ramon, and Karlita, who accommodated me for a long time in the cabana out the back of their house in Tumbaco, Ecuador.
  • Aaron, in Quito, for making sure my bike was in tip top shape and giving me his old set of Arkel panniers.
  • Magnus, of Primus, in Sweden, who couriered a maintenance kit for my Primus Omnifuel to me in Tumbaco and to Eric, also of Primus, who then talked me through my (ultimately failed) attempts to remedy the stove’s intractable problems.
  • Padre Bautista, in Angamarca, who has an open door and real Italian coffee.
  • The good people of Mindina who put me up in the community centre.
  • Padre Antonio Polo, of Salinas, Ecuador, whose kindness, good grace and hospitality are impeccable and inspiring.
  • The woman in Atillo,Ecuador, who looked after my bike while I hiked to Achapullas.
  • The owners of the restaurant in Tingo Veijo, Peru, who let cyclists camp in their yard by the river, for free, and provide a perfect base from which to explore the ruins of Kuelap.
  • The Don Bosco community in Encañada that allowed me to spend the night in their refuge for physically and mentally disabled children. As if they didn’t already have enough to do.
  • Crista, the director of a special needs education project in Cajamarca, who took a shine to me and put me up in the project’s volunteer house for four nights.
  • The two lads that organized for me to camp in the Adan Pino Quinones Coliseo in the village of Pampas in the mountains of Peru.
  • The owners of the restaurant in Pasacacha, Peru, that allowed me to sleep inside the restaurant and generously fed me. And also the members of the road crew who watched me making up my bed as they ate and rustled up a mattress so that I was more comfortable.
  • Neil and Harriet Pike, who I first met in Huaraz; for their exceptionally congenial company; for their comprehensive knowledge of the Andes which they do not hesitate to share; for creating inspired mountain bike rides with detailed route information; and most of all for a few excellent shared adventures.
  • Celica, the charming girl who gave me directions and then accompanied me for a while on my trek of the Alpamayo Circuit without asking me for chocolate.
  • The archeologists in Hualcallan who provided me with lunch when I descended from the mountains more than slightly hungry after a 10 day trek carrying a tiny 35 litre pack and then allowed me to look around the dig.
  • The managers of Santiagos’s House, in Huaraz, for looking after my belongings and bike while I made various excursions and expeditions.
  • Britaño, of Popca, near the Huayhuash trail, who provided me with a bed for the night in the basement of his house.
  • Catalino, the ariero, (who co-incidentally turned out to be Britaño’s brother) who added my panniers to his donkeys burdens while I pushed my bike over the Huayhaush.
  • Anna-Maria, who put me up for the night in her house near Oyon.
  • The family who picked me off the cold bleak streets of Yarajhuanca and warmed me with kindness and hot chocolate, fed me and gave me a place to sleep.
  • The school director (name forgotten) in a village (name forgotten) somewhere in Peru, in that long long lonesome haul between Huaraz and Cusco, who gave me a place to sleep and summoned the English teacher to converse with me. And Maria, the English teacher herself, who gave up her time to me, provided me with tea and companionship in that chilly damp mountain village.
  • Father Carlos, in Huanta, who provided me with accommodation at the parish when every hotel in town was full because of the annual festival, in which his part was key.
  • The girl, whose name I’ve forgotten, who allowed me to sleep in her room in a tiny village in the jungle.
  • The road work team in Peru, who allowed me to pass the blockage, created by a landslide, that they were working on, rather than making me ride a couple of hundred kilometres back the way I had come and then around the long-winded diversionary route, despite the fact that I had blatantly ignored the ‘road closed’ signs.
  • Maria, in La Paz, who is one of the unsung providers of hospitality in Christian’s Casas de Ciclista fanchise.
  • Sarah and James, who I first met in Panama, and then again in Tumbaco and Huaraz, and finally teamed up with in Laz Paz to ride together for a while in Bolivia and, then again, in Peru. Thanks for many a shared meal and some glorious riding in both fine and foul weather of all kinds.
  • The man in the grocery store in Pisiga who let me camp, with Sarah and James, in the yard where he kept his herd of baby llamas.
  • The many people who gave me water and various items of food while I cycled the Lagunas in the south of Bolivia.
  • The lunch women at Catua Public School, in Catua, Argentina, who I asked for water and who gave me lunch.
  • Lee and Heide, fellow cyclists, first encountered in Cafayate, Argentina, for good company, conversation and asado.
  • Juan Valenzuela Hernandez, who let me camp in the grounds of his fruit processing plant, in the industrial heartland of Chile.
  • Kati, in Romeral,Chile, who invited me for lunch and ended up giving me her bed for the night while she slept on the couch.
  • Jacob, from Colombia, who provided good company and some interesting route ideas around the Chilean lake district.
  • Jorge, of the Villa Manihuales Casa de Ciclista for creating one of the most charming bike houses in South America on a particularly busy part of the ‘route’.
  • Mauri, of Tsonek Eco Camp, for offering cyclists a hefty discount just for turning up on two wheels and for creating such a lovely place.
  • Karen and Mike, fellow cyclists from Canada, who generously allowed me to accompany them on a four day trek out of El Chalten and sleep in their tent for the duration.
  • The astonishing, Flor , in El Calten, Argentina, who is certainly no less than an angel, for outstanding generosity.
  • Mika, in El Chalten, for cooking us all lamb.
  • Sam and Jen, for excellent company and a great day at Perito Moreno.
  • Maria, of the Tauke Aike Cafeteria in Cerro Castillo, Chile, who gave me tea, cakes, lunch and above all a place of refuge from the 100 + kilometre an hour winds howling outside.
  • Tsahi, an Israeli tourist encountered in Puerto Nateles, for excellent company and conversation but most of all for chipping away some of my most bigoted prejudices.
  • Skyler, a fellow cyclist, never encountered, but who generously provided comprehensive details of an entertaining beach route which allowed me to avoid a hundred kilometres of highway between Puerto Nateles and Punta Arenas.
  • The Municipality of Magellanes for providing roadside refuges in Patagonia where cold and wind weary travellers can shelter.
  • Facundo, of Cameron, Tierra del Fuego, Chile, who put me up for the night and fed me.
  • German and Maricela, who welcomed me in, at the end of the road, on the shores of Lago Fanago. Tierra del Fuego, Chile.
  • Jorge, an Argentian from Ushuaia, who was generous enought to put me on a boat between Maria Caleta and Puerto Williams, in Chile, and thereby giving me a free three day tour of the Austral fjords and glaciers.
  • The captain and crew of the good ship Alakush, who welcomed me aboard, fed me, tolerated my presence while they were hard at work.
  • Ken, who took me on as crew on his boat, Porvenir, despite my lack of previous experience and, thus, my lubberly ways.
  • Luis and his workmate, in Lago Tagua Tagua, who saw me scouting around in the rain and invited me to share their Sunday barbeque. Thank you for meat, homemade bread, tea and jam.
  • The young Chilean border official who took me, in a boat, as far as he could along the Rio Puelo, to the border with Argentina, to save me a few kilometres of hauling my bike along a very unsuitable trekking path in the pouring rain.
  • To the Argentian border official who allowed me to sit by the fire and dry out a little after a very soggy crossing of the Andes while he processed my passport.
  • The guy who ferried me from the Argentinian border post to Lago Puelo in an overpriced tourist boat and gave me fresh homemade jam to take the sting out of the transaction.
  • Maria Eugenia, Angel, Feliciano, Augustino in Cushamen, Chubut, Argentina, who invited me into their house for the night. Special thanks to Maria Eugenia who did my laundry for me – the first time my clothes had seen the inside of a mechanical washing device for many many months.
  • To the director and staff of Escuela No. 117 in Lagunita Salada in Chubut, Argentina, for inviting me to lunch.
  • The man in the grocery shop in Mirasol, Chubut,  for some nice route advice that directed me to a short cut which helped me avoid a couple of hundred kilometres of highway.
  • The couple in the campo, in the middle of nowhere, who I asked for water and who invited me inside to warm up and offered me maté and food.
  • The family in a car, who I stopped to ask for directions, who gave me not only information but a bag full of baked treats.
  • Flavio, of Puerto Madryn, Argentina, who welcomed me into his home for three nights.
  • Marco, Andrea and Ana, of Viedma, Argentina, for lovely meals, good company, an archery lesson and warm hospitality.
  • Diego and Natalia, of Bahia Blanca, Argentina, for ethusiastic conversations about cycle touring, some great route ideas in Venezuela and Guayana, fish for lunch two days in a row and a very comfortable bed.
  • Juan, in his grandparent’s crumbling mansion, outside Coronel Dorrego, who didn’t hesitate to invite me in and provide a welcome refuge from the torrential rain.
  • The guy who gave me a lift in his truck when my way was blocked by extensive flooding leaving the tiny village of Lin Calel, in the state of Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • The ladies in the library who let me use the free internet after hours and then found me somewhere to camp in San Fransisco de Bellocq.
  • The couple at the truck weighing station outside Necochea, Buenos Aires, Argentina, who let me sleep in their granddaughter’s cubby house.
  • Cecilia, of Santa Clara del Mar, who put me up for three nights and provided me with a constant supply of pastries from her brother’s bakery.
  • The bomberos of General Conesa, Argentina, for providing me with a place to sleep for the night out of the rain.

The list is incomplete – I have received help, support and advice from all sorts of people on my journey and my heartfelt thanks go to all of them.