Skip to content

recowata hot springs

I decide to leave Creel and head for Urique. Cass and Jeff also intend to arrive in Urique by Christmas and have a vague plan to catch the train from there to the coast to celebrate New Year and return later to pick up their bikes and continue.

In the meantime, Jason and Jeff decide to visit Recowata Hot Springs, 22 kilometres outside Creel, and since the hot springs are in the direction of Urique, I decide that I shouldn’t miss them either. I set off somewhat earlier in the day than the guys and descend into Tararecua Canyon at dusk. The road out of Creel rolls up and down. The dirt road which leads to the springs is innocuous to begin with but the final three or four kilometres drop straight down over 600 metres to the bottom of the canyon on a crazy set of roughly cobbled switchbacks. By the time I realise that I am an idiot to take my fully loaded bike all the way to the bottom it is too late to change my mind and so I continue into the gathering gloom trying to put the thought of tomorrow’s return journey out of my mind.

I get to the bottom after the sun has definitively set. I investigate the springs, which are not so much hot as warm, and I am busy rekindling a dying fire left by a day visitor when Jeff and Jason arrive sensibly carrying their things on their backs, having stashed their bikes halfway down the descent. We cook, eat and set up camp before taking the plunge.

It is cold out and the water, at around 37 degrees, on initial contact is hot but after a few minutes, when our bodies adjust, it seems barely lukewarm. However, it is certain warmer in than out, and the steam gives at least the illusion of heat, so we spend a few hours soaking in the tubs watching the stars turn in the sky above. Jeff and Jason point out Taurus and Gemini to me, welcome additions to my stellar knowledge.

Descending into Tararecua Canyon at dusk to the Recowata Hot Springs.

Descending into Tararecua Canyon at dusk to the Recowata Hot Springs.

The final three or four kilometres are ridiculously steep and roughly cobbled. If I'd had any sense and a better pack I would have left my bike at the top and just carried what I needed down.

The final three or four kilometres are ridiculously steep and roughly cobbled. If I'd had any sense and a better backpack I would have left my bike at the top and only carried what I needed down with me to the springs.

In the morning we wake to a grey chilly day. The luke-warm waters have no further appeal so we hike up the canyon along a footpath admiring the rocky wilderness which is our first real taste of the Copper Canyon complex.

Sadly, the hot springs are only warm and developed in a rather insensitive manner. A couple of workmen repaint on of the pools an unnatural blue.

Sadly, the hot springs are only warm and developed in an insensitive manner. A couple of workmen repaint one of the pools an unnatural blue.

However, a walk in the morning reveals a gorgeous canyon to explore.

However, a walk in the morning reveals a gorgeous canyon to explore.

Jeff and Jason looking out over the canyon.

Jeff and Jason looking out over the canyon.

Cactus.

I am endlessly fascinated by the infinite varieties of cactus. I find the patterning on this one intriguing.

Jason taking a relaxing break from the arduous business of walking.

Jason taking a relaxing break from the arduous business of walking.

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *